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April 30, 2004

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Comments

If we were to begin a blog, we were considering the following two points:

1) Place a disclaimer on the blog page stating that all comments would be reviewed as potential additions to the library's collection and would be considered using the library's collection development policy (link here).

2) State that comments not selected for addition to the collection were eligible for review through the regular request for review of library material form (link to form).

I am not a lawyer, but it seems to me that if contributors are put on notice that their comments would be added to the library's collection and treated as any other item acquired for use by the public, it would give the library the ability to withhold a comment.

Also, I would use a three-column blog format, with a narrow left column displaying the above disclaimer, the wide middle column for narrative and links to comments, and the narrow right column for links related to the blog's subject which had been selected for relevance by the library.

I am in the process of developing a library book blog to which the public (registration required) will be able to post. First of all I am discouraged that the registration process and computer skills required to get started will turn most of the public away, and second of all I am trying to put together a Posting Policy to prevent us from being held potentially liable. Our library does not filter internet access but simply states that viewing sexually explicit material is grounds for loss of internet privaleges. Does anyone know of a model Blog Posting Policy?

take a look at http://internetcases.blogspot.com/2005/02/webmaster-not-publisher-of-defamatory.html

I want to know if any library had been held liable for a comment from a non-library staff member. We have a blog that only three of our staff members can post to, but anyone can comment on a post. We are getting some flack from the higher ups that we might be in a position to be held liable for posted comments even if we are not the ones to have posted them. Any input from out there?

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